Biology
erinjanna121
43

• there are approximately 3,000,000,000 base pairs in the mammalian genome (genes constitute only a small portion of this total) • there are approximately 10,000 genes in the mammalian genome • a single gene averages about 10,000 base pairs in size Questions 1. Based on the assumptions above, in the mammalian genome, how many total base pairs are in all the mammalian genes? 2. What percentage (%) of the total genome does this represent? 3. What is the chance (%) that a random mutation will occur in any given gene? 4. Only 1 out of 3 mutations that occur in a gene result in a change to the protein structure. What is the probability that a random mutation will change the structure of a protein?

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(1) Answers
gracie111

3,000,000,000 base pairs 10,000 genes 10,000 base pairs per gene 1) number of base pairs are in all the mammalian = = number base pares in each gene*number of genes =10,000 *10,000=1,000,000,000 2) 1,000,000,000 is 1/3 of 3,000,000,000 because 1,000,000,000/3,000,000,000 = 1/3 which is about 0.33 which is the same as 33/100 which means it is 33% 3) A random mutation has 33% probability to occur in a gene (the same as the proportion bp gene/bp genome as asked in 2)) 4) You have to multiply both probabilities: 1/3*1/3=1/9 = 0.11 = 11/100 = 11%

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